Difference between revisions of "Correcting Wikipedia’s Exoplanet Page on Direct Imaging of Exoplanets"

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{{Infobox work
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| title = Correcting Wikipedia’s Exoplanet Page on Direct Imaging of Exoplanets
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| date = 2016
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| authors = [[Jeffrey Joseph Wolynski]]
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| link = http://vixra.org/pdf/1604.0264v1.pdf
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}}
 
'''Correcting Wikipedia’s Exoplanet Page on Direct Imaging of Exoplanets''' - scientific work related to [[Wikipedia quality]] published in 2016, written by [[Jeffrey Joseph Wolynski]].
 
'''Correcting Wikipedia’s Exoplanet Page on Direct Imaging of Exoplanets''' - scientific work related to [[Wikipedia quality]] published in 2016, written by [[Jeffrey Joseph Wolynski]].
  
 
== Overview ==
 
== Overview ==
 
An update to wikipedia’s page on direct imaging of exoplanets is provided in light of the General Theory of Stellar Metamorphosis. The author cannot edit the [[Wikipedia]] page to correct it, so an account of what it says will be recorded here, and the correction as well so that editors cannot erase the history. The following is on wikipedia’s page for exoplanets. It is under direct imaging. “Planets are extremely faint compared to their parent stars. At visible wavelengths, they usually have less than a millionth of their host star's brightness. It is difficult to detect such a faint light source, and furthermore the parent star causes a glare that tends to wash it out. It is necessary to block the light from the parent star in order to reduce the glare while leaving the light from the planet detectable; doing so is a major technical challenge which requires extreme optothermal stability. All exoplanets that have been directly imaged are both large (more massive than Jupiter) and widely separated from their parent star. Most of them are also very hot, so that they emit intense infrared radiation; the images have then been made at infrared where the planet is brighter than it is at visible wavelengths. During the gas-accretion phase of giant-planet formation the star–planet contrast may be even better in H alpha than it is in infrared—an H alpha survey is currently underway. Specially designed direct-imaging instruments such as Gemini Planet Imager, VLT-SPHERE, and SCExAO will image dozens of gas giants, however the vast majority of known extrasolar planets have only been detected through indirect methods.” The following is the correction in reference to the General Theory of Stellar Metamorphosis. “Older stars are extremely faint compared to their younger hosts. At visible wavelengths, they usually have less than a millionth of their host star’s brightness. It is difficult to detect such a faint light source, and furthermore the host star causes a glare that tends to wash it out. It is necessary to block the light from the host star in order to reduce the glare while leaving the light from the older star detectable; doing so is a major technical challenge which requires extreme optothermal stability. The very small percentage of older stars that have been directly imaged are both more massive than Jupiter and widely separated from its host star. Most of them are also much cooler than their host, but still radiate in the infrared, and imaging them at those frequencies is easier than with visible light. There is no gas-accretion phase of giant-planet formation, because as the star cools, it combines its elements into molecules and becomes the older star that continues radiating strongly in the infrared as it loses mass to solar wind and flaring. This explains both gas giant formation and why they are always radiant in the infrared. Specially designed direct-imaging instruments such as Gemini Planet Imager, VLT-SPHERE, and SCExAO will image dozens of gas giants, however the vast majority of known older stars have only been detected through indirect methods. About 6,000 of the youngest exoplanets (stars) can be easily directly imaged from Earth without any telescope or viewing apparatus. With the help of powerful new telescopes, many billions of young exoplanets can be observed, as they shine brightly in the visible spectrum across the Galaxy, and other galaxies. As the reader can see, replacing “parent” with “host” is more correct, placing exoplanets as older stars is more correct, and even referring to young stars as young exoplanets is more correct. Author hope this serves people well in the search for truth in nature, and to not let the arrogant fools of establishment astrophysics and astronomy wash out the good judgment of common sense people, with endless institutionalization and non-observation of Earth and Jupiter sized objects forming from dust and marbles. It takes a star to form something the grandiosity of a planet, because that is what a planet is, an older, evolving star and nothing less.
 
An update to wikipedia’s page on direct imaging of exoplanets is provided in light of the General Theory of Stellar Metamorphosis. The author cannot edit the [[Wikipedia]] page to correct it, so an account of what it says will be recorded here, and the correction as well so that editors cannot erase the history. The following is on wikipedia’s page for exoplanets. It is under direct imaging. “Planets are extremely faint compared to their parent stars. At visible wavelengths, they usually have less than a millionth of their host star's brightness. It is difficult to detect such a faint light source, and furthermore the parent star causes a glare that tends to wash it out. It is necessary to block the light from the parent star in order to reduce the glare while leaving the light from the planet detectable; doing so is a major technical challenge which requires extreme optothermal stability. All exoplanets that have been directly imaged are both large (more massive than Jupiter) and widely separated from their parent star. Most of them are also very hot, so that they emit intense infrared radiation; the images have then been made at infrared where the planet is brighter than it is at visible wavelengths. During the gas-accretion phase of giant-planet formation the star–planet contrast may be even better in H alpha than it is in infrared—an H alpha survey is currently underway. Specially designed direct-imaging instruments such as Gemini Planet Imager, VLT-SPHERE, and SCExAO will image dozens of gas giants, however the vast majority of known extrasolar planets have only been detected through indirect methods.” The following is the correction in reference to the General Theory of Stellar Metamorphosis. “Older stars are extremely faint compared to their younger hosts. At visible wavelengths, they usually have less than a millionth of their host star’s brightness. It is difficult to detect such a faint light source, and furthermore the host star causes a glare that tends to wash it out. It is necessary to block the light from the host star in order to reduce the glare while leaving the light from the older star detectable; doing so is a major technical challenge which requires extreme optothermal stability. The very small percentage of older stars that have been directly imaged are both more massive than Jupiter and widely separated from its host star. Most of them are also much cooler than their host, but still radiate in the infrared, and imaging them at those frequencies is easier than with visible light. There is no gas-accretion phase of giant-planet formation, because as the star cools, it combines its elements into molecules and becomes the older star that continues radiating strongly in the infrared as it loses mass to solar wind and flaring. This explains both gas giant formation and why they are always radiant in the infrared. Specially designed direct-imaging instruments such as Gemini Planet Imager, VLT-SPHERE, and SCExAO will image dozens of gas giants, however the vast majority of known older stars have only been detected through indirect methods. About 6,000 of the youngest exoplanets (stars) can be easily directly imaged from Earth without any telescope or viewing apparatus. With the help of powerful new telescopes, many billions of young exoplanets can be observed, as they shine brightly in the visible spectrum across the Galaxy, and other galaxies. As the reader can see, replacing “parent” with “host” is more correct, placing exoplanets as older stars is more correct, and even referring to young stars as young exoplanets is more correct. Author hope this serves people well in the search for truth in nature, and to not let the arrogant fools of establishment astrophysics and astronomy wash out the good judgment of common sense people, with endless institutionalization and non-observation of Earth and Jupiter sized objects forming from dust and marbles. It takes a star to form something the grandiosity of a planet, because that is what a planet is, an older, evolving star and nothing less.

Latest revision as of 08:41, 11 February 2020


Correcting Wikipedia’s Exoplanet Page on Direct Imaging of Exoplanets
Authors
Jeffrey Joseph Wolynski
Publication date
2016
Links
Original

Correcting Wikipedia’s Exoplanet Page on Direct Imaging of Exoplanets - scientific work related to Wikipedia quality published in 2016, written by Jeffrey Joseph Wolynski.

Overview

An update to wikipedia’s page on direct imaging of exoplanets is provided in light of the General Theory of Stellar Metamorphosis. The author cannot edit the Wikipedia page to correct it, so an account of what it says will be recorded here, and the correction as well so that editors cannot erase the history. The following is on wikipedia’s page for exoplanets. It is under direct imaging. “Planets are extremely faint compared to their parent stars. At visible wavelengths, they usually have less than a millionth of their host star's brightness. It is difficult to detect such a faint light source, and furthermore the parent star causes a glare that tends to wash it out. It is necessary to block the light from the parent star in order to reduce the glare while leaving the light from the planet detectable; doing so is a major technical challenge which requires extreme optothermal stability. All exoplanets that have been directly imaged are both large (more massive than Jupiter) and widely separated from their parent star. Most of them are also very hot, so that they emit intense infrared radiation; the images have then been made at infrared where the planet is brighter than it is at visible wavelengths. During the gas-accretion phase of giant-planet formation the star–planet contrast may be even better in H alpha than it is in infrared—an H alpha survey is currently underway. Specially designed direct-imaging instruments such as Gemini Planet Imager, VLT-SPHERE, and SCExAO will image dozens of gas giants, however the vast majority of known extrasolar planets have only been detected through indirect methods.” The following is the correction in reference to the General Theory of Stellar Metamorphosis. “Older stars are extremely faint compared to their younger hosts. At visible wavelengths, they usually have less than a millionth of their host star’s brightness. It is difficult to detect such a faint light source, and furthermore the host star causes a glare that tends to wash it out. It is necessary to block the light from the host star in order to reduce the glare while leaving the light from the older star detectable; doing so is a major technical challenge which requires extreme optothermal stability. The very small percentage of older stars that have been directly imaged are both more massive than Jupiter and widely separated from its host star. Most of them are also much cooler than their host, but still radiate in the infrared, and imaging them at those frequencies is easier than with visible light. There is no gas-accretion phase of giant-planet formation, because as the star cools, it combines its elements into molecules and becomes the older star that continues radiating strongly in the infrared as it loses mass to solar wind and flaring. This explains both gas giant formation and why they are always radiant in the infrared. Specially designed direct-imaging instruments such as Gemini Planet Imager, VLT-SPHERE, and SCExAO will image dozens of gas giants, however the vast majority of known older stars have only been detected through indirect methods. About 6,000 of the youngest exoplanets (stars) can be easily directly imaged from Earth without any telescope or viewing apparatus. With the help of powerful new telescopes, many billions of young exoplanets can be observed, as they shine brightly in the visible spectrum across the Galaxy, and other galaxies. As the reader can see, replacing “parent” with “host” is more correct, placing exoplanets as older stars is more correct, and even referring to young stars as young exoplanets is more correct. Author hope this serves people well in the search for truth in nature, and to not let the arrogant fools of establishment astrophysics and astronomy wash out the good judgment of common sense people, with endless institutionalization and non-observation of Earth and Jupiter sized objects forming from dust and marbles. It takes a star to form something the grandiosity of a planet, because that is what a planet is, an older, evolving star and nothing less.